Creating a business website – What do I need?

Preview - Creating a business website – What do I need?
This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series - Web Design Project Advise

You may have recognised the need for a new business website, but do know what you actually need it to do? Here are some critical questions you need to answer before approaching a web development agency so you can be sure you get exactly what you need.

Is my website expected to turn a profit?

Is your new website going to function as an extension of your current business? Is it going to be a storefront, or a way of generating sales leads? Ultimately, what do I want it to do? Deciding whether your website will provide a revenue stream is critical to ensure that every effort is focused towards that goal.

You will also need to be clear as to how your site will generate that profit. If you are creating an ecommerce site, the answer is clear. If not, you need to try and calculate a financial value for each lead generated or similar metric by which you can measure “success”.

Here at Bytewire we go even further, encouraging potential client to consider how much profit they expect their website to generate annually and how that figure is arrived at. Does that projected earning make your business more profitable? If not, are your projected website earnings to low?

The more detailed you can get when planning your website needs, the more likely you are to get the website required to meet them. You will also scare away web developers who are unable to deliver on concrete requirements, saving you plenty of trouble in future.

How will the website benefit my customers?

Truth time – your website exists to benefit your customers first, any rewards for your business are secondary. So when planning a new web development you need to seriously consider what advantages it will offer your clients.

If you already have a website, try and find out whether there is anything existing customer particularly like or dislike about it. The dislikes provide opportunities to improve your offering encouraging clients to keep coming back.

But if you are looking to have your first ever website built, define how it will supplement (or even supplant) your existing channels. Will it save your customers a trip to your bricks-and-mortar store? Will it make shopping quicker and easier? What will it do for them

What are my plans for the website?

When shopping around for a new business website, you have clearly identified something about your existing site which disappoints you. This may be the design and layout, or a function you believe would help improve your customer’s experience. Whatever the issues are, make a note for discussion with potential web development partners.

You should also be answering longer-term questions, such as “how much of my business will be coming from online sources in the next five years?” and “what are my ongoing online marketing plans”. When delivered, your website is like a snapshot in time and will require additional marketing efforts to ensure it remains relevant and productive in the wider scheme of your business.

Write it all down

Brainstorm your website ideas. Get input from your employees, customers and suppliers. Jot them all down along with the answers to the above starting points and then formulate a requirements document that can be presented to companies you are considering for web development services.

Not only will this document help clarify in your own mind exactly what is required from a new website, but it will also help provide a clear statement of intent when discussing plans with developers.

Finished your requirements document? Or maybe need help creating one? Why not give Bytewire a call today on 01621 856628 to see how our flexible development plans can help you get the site and service you need.


Blog written by Dave

I am one of the Directors of Bytewire and I like to blog about lots of different and interesting stuff surrounding the website design and development world.


Leave your thoughts

You may use these HTML tags and attributes in your comments.